Sunday, May 19, 2024
Advertisements

Half a Century since Discovery: The World’s Largest Uncut Diamond

April 17, 2024 marks fifty years since the unearthing of the world’s largest octahedral diamond, a monumental gem that continues to captivate with its untouched, unpolished, and unsold status.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Dating back to April 17, 1974, the 616-carat Type 1 yellow diamond hails from the depths of the Dutoitspan Mine in Kimberley, South Africa. This historic mine, which commenced operations in the 1870s, ceased its activities in 2005, leaving behind a legacy of remarkable finds.

Advertisements

Abel Maretela, an esteemed employee of De Beers, was the fortunate discoverer of this extraordinary gem. His remarkable find earned him not only widespread acclaim but also a substantial bonus and a home, a testament to the significance of his discovery.

Recently, Al Cook, CEO of the De Beers Group, had the exclusive opportunity to behold this legendary diamond during a visit to Johannesburg. Moses Madondo, CEO of De Beers Group managed operations, graciously facilitated the viewing, offering a rare glimpse into the awe-inspiring world of diamond history.

Reflecting on this momentous occasion, Cook shared his profound fascination with the intricate origins of diamonds, a passion that transcends time and discovery. “As a geologist,” Cook expressed in a LinkedIn post, “I am deeply intrigued by the origins of diamonds, even predating their discovery.”

Delving into the geological marvel of the Type 1 classification, Cook elucidated that this diamond’s formation traces back approximately 150 kilometers beneath the Earth’s surface, within the depths of the mantle, over a billion years ago. A testament to the enduring forces of nature, this gem’s journey is a testament to the enduring mysteries of our planet’s geological past.

It was during the Cretaceous period, approximately 100 million years ago, that a kimberlite volcano served as the conduit for this diamond’s ascent to the Earth’s surface. Encapsulating its journey with a vibrant yellow hue, attributed to nitrogen atoms intricately entwined within the carbon lattice during its formative years within the mantle.

As this historic gem commemorates fifty years since its discovery, it continues to serve as a beacon of wonder, symbolizing the timeless allure and enduring mysteries of the diamond world.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Related Articles

Latest Articles